6 Months into the Pandemic: What’s working and what do we still desperately need to do?

Prevention Institute Executive Director Rachel Davis joins women leaders in healthcare, health equity, and public health for a broad-ranging conversation about what we’ve learned six months into the coronavirus pandemic and what we still desperately need to do. The podcast guests discuss topics including inconsistent and inadequate data collection, attacks on public health leaders, and the importance of an equitable recovery. Rachel is joined by Dr. Shari Barkin, the Chief of General Pediatrics at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, TN and a well-respected community researcher; Dr. Jewel Mullen, the associate dean for health equity at the Dell Medical School at the University of Texas in Austin and a previous public health commissioner in Connecticut; and Chrissie Juliano, the executive director of the Big Cities Health Coalition, which is composed of America’s largest metropolitan health departments.

*Photo credit: Satoko Arw

If you want to talk health, you have to talk racial justice

In this short video, Prevention Institute’s deputy executive director, Manal J. Aboelata, introduces the concepts of health equity and racial justice and explains why we can’t achieve health as a nation without taking on structural racism. So many of the unjust and unfair outcomes that we see in communities in terms of health, safety, and wellbeing are connected to racism, discrimination, and other forms of racial injustice. That means we need to engage deeply in work that will close racially unjust gaps in health outcomes in order to achieve health, safety, and wellbeing for our nation as a whole.

Applying a racial justice lens to mental health and wellbeing

In this podcast Sana Chehimi, director of policy and advocacy for Prevention Institute, interviews Isha Weerasinghe, a senior policy analyst on the youth team at the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP). They discuss the importance of supporting mental health and wellbeing for communities of color to achieve an equitable COVID-19 recovery and as part of dismantling systems that perpetuate structural violence and racism. Isha describes how applying a racial justice lens to center lived experiences and community leadership allows CLASP to broaden the understanding of mental health and wellbeing and develop policy solutions and strategies that are otherwise overlooked.

 

Read more about CLASP’s work:

Behind the Asterisk*: Perspectives on Young Adult Mental Health from "Small and Hard-to-Reach" Communities
www.clasp.org/publications/repor…ef/behind-asterisk

Reconnecting, Realizing and Reimagining Justice: Advancing Economic Justice for Individuals and Communities Impacted by the Criminal Justice System
www.clasp.org/publications/repor…econnectingjustice

“Everybody Got Their Go Throughs”: Young Adults on the Frontlines of Mental Health
www.clasp.org/sites/default/file…-Mental-Health.pdf

Between the Lines: Understanding Our Country’s Racialized Response to the Opioid Overdose Epidemic
www.clasp.org/publications/repor…ed-response-opioid

Ten Core Competencies for Youth and Young Adult Centered Mental Health Systems
www.clasp.org/publications/repor…tal-health-systems

Refining Evidence-Based Practices: Expanding Our View of Evidence
www.clasp.org/publications/repor…-our-view-evidence

Unlocking Transformation and Healing: Overview of Policy Options for Accessible Youth and Young Adult Mental Health Care
www.clasp.org/publications/repor…options-accessible

Mental and Behavioral Health System Fixes During the COVID-19 Crisis, and Beyond
www.clasp.org/publications/repor…ovid-19-crisis-and

*Photo credit: Sarah Mittermaier

Ending violence by the police and in the community: calls to action for justice and peace

In this podcast, Prevention Institute’s Lisa Fujie Parks interviews Anthony Smith from Cities United and Cuco Rodriguez from the Hope and Heal Fund about advocating with mayors and school districts to divest from policing and invest in proven public health approaches to community safety, like violence interruption and youth employment opportunities. They highlight the need for cities and philanthropy to invest equitably. and for white-led organizations to act as allies in support of frontline, organizations led by and that support African American communities and other communities of color. These community-based organizations are not only working to stop violence, they are also protecting people from COVID-19, connecting people to food and jobs, and supporting culturally rooted multigenerational healing.

Photo credit: Kiara Thompson, via Instagram

MC:ID How We’re Staying Connected

Making Connections International District—also known as MC:ID—is a youth-led, intergenerational collaborative through which young men of color act as agents of positive change in their community. As life in Albuquerque’s International District shifts to prevent the spread of COVID-19, MC:ID partners have had to find new ways to connect so they can impact decisions about where their community goes from here. Learn more at www.togetherforbrothers.org. MC: ID is part of the national Making Connections Initiative, funded by Movember.

Coronavirus: from the urgency of reaction to the importance of long-term action

Prevention Institute Executive Director Rachel Davis joins women leaders in healthcare, health equity, and public health for a broad-ranging conversation about the coronavirus crisis, what it reveals about our society’s inequities, and what we can learn from it to ensure a healthier and more equitable society moving forward. The podcast guests discuss topics ranging from questions about the term “social distancing” to ideas for turning the current media moment of reaction into a national agenda for action. Dr. Karen Remley, the former health commissioner of the Commonwealth of Virginia and former CEO of the American Academy of Pediatrics, hosts the podcast. She and Rachel Davis are joined by Dr. Shari Barkin, the Chief of General Pediatrics at the Monroe Carrel Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, TN and a well-respected community researcher; and Dr. Jewel Mullen, the associate dean for health equity at the Dell Medical School at the University of Texas in Austin and a previous public health commissioner in Connecticut.

Equitable housing is key to health

Stable, safe, and affordable housing is critical to health. But across the state of California, more and more people are being displaced, particularly low income communities and communities of color. In this episode of Moving Upstream, Prevention Institute’s Associate Program Director Sandra Viera interviews leaders from California’s Central Orange County, High Desert, Sonoma, and Eureka communities who seek to improve health through equitable housing policy as part of the Intersections Initiative. Intersections brings together coalitions that include healthcare in seven California communities. These coalitions are working to achieve health equity through strategies that emphasize elevating resident voices, working across issue areas, and strengthening policies and practices. This work is made possible by the St. Joseph Health Community Partnership Fund. Learn more at intersectionsinitiativeorg.wordpress.com/

Prevention Institute: Partnering to achieve thriving, equitable communities

This video tells the story of Prevention Institute’s equity-driven, upstream, community-level approach to public health. It focuses on two communities we collaborated with that brought together community members, government agencies, grassroots nonprofits, and health organizations to improve the community conditions that shape health. In Honolulu, through the Making Connections initiative, a community health center and its partners are helping boys of color heal and thrive by incorporating the community’s rich cultural traditions into leadership training and multi-generational mentoring at a local bicycle exchange. In Milwaukee, the Office of Violence Prevention developed the Milwaukee Blueprint for Peace, a comprehensive violence-prevention plan that’s coincided with a three-year decline in Milwaukee homicides and non-fatal shootings. This video was made possible with support from The Kresge Foundation, The Movember Foundation, and others.

How communities working on mental health for men and boys build and sustain momentum

What Medellín can teach use about healthy and equitable land use

PI’s deputy executive director, Manal J. Aboelata, talks about her recent trip to Medellín, Colombia to learn about their innovative improvements to the city’s infrastructure. She explains how this city that was not long ago called “one of the most dangerous cities on earth” has transformed itself through public health investments, and what we in the United States can learn from its example.